Understanding gangs of starlings

Starlings above Rome. Photo from the Telegraph.

Rather than affecting every other flock member, orientation changes caused only a bird’s seven closest neighbors to alter their flight. That number stayed consistent regardless of flock density, making the equations “topological” rather than critical in nature.

“The orientations are not at a critical point,” said Giardina. Even without criticality, however, changes rippled quickly through flocks — from one starling to seven neighbors, each of which affected seven more neighbors, and so on.

The closest statistical fit for this behavior comes from the physics of magnetism, and describes how the electron spins of particles align with their neighbors as metals become magnetized.

via Starling Flocks Behave Like Flying Magnets | Wired Science | Wired.com.

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Filed under Animals, communication, learning, nature

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